EA Sports NCAA Basketball Archives

EA Sports NCAA Basketball Archives

EA Sports NCAA Basketball Archives

EA Sports NCAA Basketball Archives

NCCNews Archive

(c) AP 2011

by Isaac Berky Syracuse(NCC News)- When EA Sports reached a settlement in O’Bannon v. Et. Al this past week the NCAA was left as the only defendant still in the case.   The case centered around the use of the likeness of former and current NCAA athletes in the NCAA Football and Basketball games.  Since the start of the case EA Sports has announced that they will not be making their NCAA Football game next season.

How do athletes feel about being used in games?

Former SU punter Rob Long enjoyed being able to use himself in a video game.

“I think back then I didn’t really think much of it.  I enjoyed being able to go into a video game and use someone that was basically myself.  Someone that had the same characteristics as me…. Once I got a little removed I realized how much money companies like EA were making off of the likenesses of athletes.”

While Long did not go as far as to sue EA for using his likeness others across the nation did.

The O’Bannon case has opened the door once again for the discussion of whether or not student athletes should receive payment for playing sports.

Should Athletes be payed?

Every year the Big Five conferences, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12, ACC, SEC, bring in millions of dollars through sporting events.  The members of these institutions are able to add lots of revenue each year that they would not have without their student athletes.  A key question that has been hanging around for the last few years is whether or not athletes should receive a portion of that revenue.

The commitment of playing division one athletics in college is a full-time job Long feels.

“You are there 40 hours a week, after classes and everything else.”  Forty hours, as many as someone working a full-time job would work in a week.  The players cannot receive any payment for their work however.

During his time playing for SU Long saw several situations where teammates struggled with money problems because they did not have time to work a job to make some money.  While he was never in this situation, he did have teammates who either had to go without something or find other sometimes drastic measures to make money.

What Does EA settling mean for the NCAA?

The NCAA has said they will fight to the end of the law suit.  SU Sports Management professor Rick Burton thinks that the NCAA will be “facing an uphill battle” as they fight this case.

Burton believes that in the long run this case could help change the landscape of collegiate sports as we know it.

“I think that we could see the more recognizable players who are in the newer video games the ’10, ’11, ’12 games come forward and get paid soon.”

Several options for paying athletes have been tossed around however for now student athletes will not be paid.

Watch the story here:  

This entry was posted in BDJ 664.02, Sports, Syracuse and tagged College Sports, EA Sports, NCAA, NCAA Football, Revenue Sharing on by Isaac Berky.

(c)AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, 2010

By Nicole Acevedo SYRACUSE (NCC NEWS)– The NCAA recently announced that they will develop a plan to address mental illnesses in athletes. Syracuse University was one of the first colleges to implement a NATA consensus statement to address these issues. For this reason, the NCAA is using SU as a model to implement its own statement.

“We were one of the first institutions to develop an institutional psychological concern policy for student athletes,” said the Assistant Director of Sports Medicine in Syracuse University, Tim Neal.

The policy was developed several years ago with the collaboration of the Athletics Department, Student Affairs, Risk Management, Legal Council, among others.

“We took the Syracuse model, develop that as part of the consensus statement that was sponsored by the NATA,” said Neal who was also the chairperson in developing the NATA statement.

There is already a prevalence of psychological disorders among college age people

Studies show that one in four people between the ages of 18 to 25 suffer from some kind of mental disorder.

“If you ad in the triggers and the stresses of being a student athlete: they are under the microscope, they miss holidays, they miss family functions, they are in training year-round… If you ad in the percentages and the triggers you have a really good chance of triggering in them a psychological concern or having a student coming in with one already,” said Neal.

Once a potential problem is identified in an athlete, they encourage the student to go to the mental health care system for an evaluation.

“This doesn’t mean that they have a problem, unless there is a professional determining what’s going on” said Neal

As part of the consensus statement, the SU model for dealing with athlete’s mental issues lets the student decide if they should get help or not after being encouraged by the Athletic Department to seek for it. “I try to put it in terms for the athletes, as that this is no different that your physical health… If you are struggling with anxiety, or depression… let’s get you to a mental care professional and see what the problem is,” said Neal.

When the student-athlete goes to council there is a three-step procedure to be followed. First, they are educated about what they are going through. Secondly, counselors teach them what their triggers are: what can cause them anxiety or anger, etc. Thirdly, they teach them mechanisms to help them control these conditions and be able to be functional adults.

The NCAA will hold a conference in Indianapolis to start a broader plan

Tim Neal will be part of the panel that will be coming up with recommendations to create the plan.

Neal considers mental illnesses to be a problem of public health concern. He hopes that with the NCAA making athletes come forward and address their psychological disorders, other people might feel encouraged to be the same thing too.

Listen to the story here:

Acevedo_NCAA Wrap

 

This entry was posted in BDJ 364.01, Health, NCC-N, Onondaga County, Sports, Syracuse and tagged mental issues, NCAA, Syracuse University, Tim Neal on by Nicole Acevedo.

(c) 2013 Mary Kline Classic Inc. courtesy of Tug Haines

By Alex Kline SYRACUSE (NCC NEWS) – While some Central New York student-athletes are bound to struggle in classes this fall, the NCAA may have some responsibility in this. This is due to the NCAA Eligibility Center’s clearance of incoming freshmen who are division one athletes. If they do not meet the academic requirements laid out by the NCAA, their eligibility is in question. One Syracuse University incoming freshman dealt with this situation to an extreme level.

Tyler Roberson, a highly touted 6-foot-9 freshman forward out of Roselle Catholic in New Jersey, has been waiting to see if his high school transcript meets the NCAA’s minimum requirements for incoming freshmen to be eligible to play. Roberson missed summer school at Syracuse University, which began in July, by taking summer courses at his high school, Roselle Catholic, to raise his grades in order to meet initial requirements. Once he completed this in late July, his high school sent the NCAA his paperwork. After missing the first two weeks of college classes, Syracuse University officials finally heard from the NCAA on Wednesday, September 4th. Roberson had been fully cleared to begin classes to play this year.

While Roberson becoming eligible to start classes and begin working out with the team was positive, a student-athlete who has struggled in school before had now missed all of his college summer courses and some of his regular courses. This puts him at a disadvantage to begin his collegiate academic career. Who is to blame for this?

The Blame Game

With the future of thousands of incoming freshmen student-athletes up in jeopardy as school gets closer, most of the blame is thrown on the NCAA for not making decisions quick enough. “You have kids that struggle academically, do all they can to put themselves in position to be a qualifier and then the NCAA drags their feet and puts kids at a disadvantage academically,” a source close to the situation told NCC News. “It puts them in a hole right from the jump of their academic career.” The NCAA certainly does seem as if they are making it tougher for student-athletes to succeed at the next level when they are missing college classes from the get go.

However, the NCAA isn’t solely responsible for this. The student-athlete must take responsibility for it, as well, according to Syracuse Post Standard writer Mike Waters, who covers the Syracuse Men’s Basketball team. “You can’t blame the NCAA for the fact that Tyler Roberson had to go to summer school in order to get eligible or in the attempt to get eligible and, therefore, his transcript comes in behind the thousands of transcripts that comes in from all the sports,” Waters said Friday. Waters also brought up transferring high schools, the impact of international transcripts, concentrating on academics early on, and taking certain courses to meet standards as key red flags in a situation like this, which has held up the clearing process.

A Resolution to a Few Weeks

Whether missing all of summer school at Syracuse University, as well as the first two weeks of regular classes impacts Roberson in a negative way academically is yet to be seen. While it is undeniably a tough adjustment, he should be fine in the long haul. “I think a week or two, he should be made up,” Waters told NCC. “He’s going to get a lot of academic support at Syracuse. The academic support they provide is amazing.” Ultimately, Roberson is safe in this situation after a long battle, but this is clearly evidence that will further the need for student-athletes to not only do well in high school courses early and often, but to take the proper courses in order to avoid this hiccup in the system. The NCAA and the student-athlete are equally at fault in this situation, but the delay by the clearinghouse is certainly problematic, as well.

This entry was posted in BDJ 364.02 and tagged college basketball, NCAA, NCAA Compliance, Roselle Catholic, Syracuse, Syracuse Basketball, Syracuse University, Tyler Roberson, Tyler Roberson Cleared on by Alexander Kline.

©2013 Casey Kulik

By Casey Kulik SYRACUSE (NCC NEWS)- The Syracuse University Campus is electric with students excited to watch the Orange play Michigan this weekend.  Many students are traveling down to Atlanta thanks to discounted tickets by the university, but not all the teachers are playing along.

The deal

Students have been offered a deal by the university of $40 for tickets to attend both the Final Four and the Championship of the NCAA Tournament in Atlanta.  There is limited travel being offered by the university, but many students are still ecstatic about the discounted tickets.

The opposition

The Final Four games are on Saturday, but the championship will take place Monday night so students attending would have to miss whatever classes they had Monday.  Although the university is offering this discount many teachers are not excusing students from class, and needless to say students are not pleased.

“He said it’s called student-athletes not athlete-students so the test is on and I guess you’ll just have to miss it,” said Alyssa Avanzato, a student going to Atlanta,”I mean it’s a big deal he doesn’t really get it.”

Many students think it is hypocritical that the university has offered this and the teachers are not complying.

“I think it’s absolutely hypocritical,” said freshman Dominic Buccieri, “I think it’s irrelevant and there’s a lot of ego from the teacher’s perspective.”

Not all professors are begin quite as strict though, French Professor Cory Trombley has students that are going, and is working with them to make it possible.

“Pretty much hey she’s gone, she’s missing class, but she is going to make up her work, so I can’t really complain about it you know?”

Trombley said he thinks the university and the teachers should collaborate more so that this type of conflict does not occur.

Even though she is missing a test, Avanzato says she will still go to Atlanta.

“Yeah I’m still going to go and my final will just be worth twice as much, so almost 45% of my grade,” said Avanzato.

Syracuse plays Michigan Saturday night and if they advance will play Monday night against either Louisville or Wichita State.

Watch the story here:

This entry was posted in BDJ 464.01 and tagged Atlanta, Final Four, NCAA, school, students, Syracuse Orange on by Casey Kulik.

© 2013 Associated Press

By Valeria Aponte SYRACUSE (NCC NEWS) – With just one day until the NCAA Final Four, students from Syracuse University and residents of the city are making their way down to Atlanta for the big game.

For those of you driving expect to be on the road for approximately 15 hours. If you plan on taking a bus it will be longer since their are several stops on the way. Taking the train is faster but Amtrak announced that all trains going to Atlanta are completely sold out. Right now if you have not bought your ticket flying might be your best bet since Delta announced today that they have added more direct nonstop flights from Syracuse to Atlanta. However, one-way tickets cost over $600 and round-trip over $1,000 but some students are saying its worth it.

“It’s one of those things where it’s worth it to spend the money on flying down there,” Marisa DeCandido, Syracuse University student, said. “I mean you can spend almost as much money this weekend at Chuck’s as you would on a flight to actually go to watch your team play.”

Syracuse will face off Michigan on Saturday at 8:50 p.m. if they win they head to the finals on Monday, April 8.

Click here to watch story:

 

This entry was posted in BDJ 465.02 and tagged Amtrak, Atlanta, basketball, Delta, Final Four, NCAA, Syracuse on by Valeria Aponte.

Employees remove the “Fighting Sioux” sign from Ralph Engleston Arena. © 2012 Associated Press photo by John Stennes

By Bill Spaulding GRAND FORKS, ND (NCC NEWS)- Workers removed a controversial sign from the University of North Dakota’s hockey arena this afternoon.

After years of fighting with the NCAA, the University has decided to remove six signs that depict or present the University’s nickname, the Fighting Sioux.

Today’s removal of the “Home of the Fighting Sioux” sign on Ralph Engleston Arena is the first and easiest of the six signs to be taken down. Some, like a ten-foot-tall sketch of a Native American warrior inside the hockey arena will be harder to remove.

The NCAA has cracked down on what it considers to be insensitive nicknames in recent years, with North Dakota’s Fighting Sioux nickname located near the top of the list.

For now, North Dakota will without a nickname until the 2014 academic year. The sign taken down today at Engleston Arena will be replaced in the coming days by a sign that says “the Home of North Dakota Hockey.”

This entry was posted in BDJ 465.01 and tagged Fighting Sioux, NCAA, North Dakota, North Dakota University on by Bill Spaulding.

By Tim Killian SYRACUSE (NCC NEWS) – The University of Notre Dame has announced it will be leaving the Big East Conference to join the Atlantic Coast Conference, according to ESPN.com’s Brett McMurphy.

The move will include all Notre Dame sports except football, which will remain an independent program. In order to join the conference in all other sports, however, Notre Dame must schedule five football games against ACC opponents each season.

The ACC released a statement on Wednesday, saying the move went beyond just athletics.

“The addition of Notre Dame further strengthens the rich tradition and culture of the ACC as well as allowing for future academic collaboration and we enthusiastically welcome them into the league,” said the ACC Council of Presidents in a joint statement.

The ACC, which previously announced divisions for a 14-team basketball league, will now have to change plans to make room for a 15th team in Notre Dame. While welcoming the Fighting Irish, the ACC also voted to increase its conference exit fee to more than $50 million.

Notre Dame follows Syracuse and Pittsburgh to the ACC

The Big East Conference continues to change, after a busy year of conference realignment. Earlier in the year, both Syracuse University and the University of Pittsburgh announced they would be leaving the Big East in favor the ACC.

Typically, the Big East requires a 27-month notice and a $5 million fee for exiting the conference, but both Syracuse and Pittsburgh paid a $7.5 fee in July so they could join the ACC in 2013, according to Businessweek.com.

The University of Notre Dame has not yet announced when it plans to exit the Big East.

This entry was posted in BDJ 465.01 and tagged ACC, Big East, NCAA, Sports, Syracuse University, University of Notre Dame, University of Pittsburgh on by Timothy Killian.

“Syracuse University sophomore men’s basketball center Fab Melo did not travel with the team to Pittsburgh, and will not take part in the NCAA Tournament due to an eligibility issue. Given University policy and federal student privacy laws, no further details can be provided at this time.”

Watch video with student reactions below, Cody S. Combs reports…

 

This entry was posted in Sports and tagged basketball, Cody Sigel Combs, Fab Melo, March Madness, NCAA, Syracuse, Syracuse Orange, Syracuse University on by Cody Combs.

Team GPA Increases

©2011 Associated Press

by Erica Morrow (Syracuse) – Syracuse University Women’s and Men’s basketball teams have to worry about more than just winning basketball games. They also have to stay on top of academics.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association has passed new policies for Division I athletes. Not only are individual players required to have certain GPA’s but now teams have to have an overall GPA of 2.8

“I think the increase in GPA is a great thing because it will push more student athletes to be students,” says Syracuse University mentor Debi Belanger.

Syracuse Support Staff on Top of Academics

Syracuse University athletes are required to do study hall hours and adhere to university academic standards.

“Freshmen have to have 24% of their degree completed in order to be eligible to play,” says Academic Coordinator Joe Fields.

The academic facility, Stevenson Educational Center is where all Syracuse athletes are required to do work and study. Fields says that athletes who do not meet those requirement may have to do extra study hall, have mentors and/or can be suspended from competition.

Teams Under Strict Scrutiny

The UCONN huskies, defending National Championship Basketball team, are one of the many teams in jeopardy of not being able to compete in the NCAA tournament this year. If you base their academic performance on the last two years, it is almost impossible for them to reach the team GPA.

“Athletes need to understand that they cant play basketball forever. One day they will need their education,” says student athlete Elashier Hall.

 

Watch the Story Here:

 

This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged GPA Requirements, NCAA, Stevenson Academic Center, Syracuse Athletics on by Erica Morrow.

photo by Hillary Fonseca

by Hillary Fonseca – (SYRACUSE, NY). Athletic programs all over the country bring in millions of dollars every year in revenue. These earnings go to the coaches, apparel companies, and many other outlets, but not to the athletes themselves. This begs the question: Should NCAA athletes be paid?

Many people believe that although athletes currently do not receive a weekly stipend, they are being paid in many other ways. “Voice of the Orange” Matt Park is one of the people not in favor of athletes being paid.

“It’s the scholarship, the travel, the connections, the fame, all of that for your services to the university and that’s up to the student-athlete to make the decision of whether that’s something they want to do or not,” Park said.

A recent study done by USA Today has determined that a typical division one men’s basketball player receives at least $120,000 annually in goods, services and future earnings for his athletic work. This includes grants-in-aid, general administrative support, equipment, uniforms, marketing and promotion, medical insurance premiums, game tickets, and future earnings.

Some athletes are paid illegally

These figures do not include the money that athletes receive behind-the-scenes from agents and boosters.

“In the SEC they are still getting twenty-dollar handshakes after the games. They have been for decades and they will be until somebody cracks down on it. And paying them isn’t going to put an end to that,” Park said.

One of the most well-known scandals involved the “Fab Five” of the University of Michigan men’s basketball team in the early to mid-nineties. Booster Ed Martin had developed a close relationship with the “Fab Five” and other future Michigan players. In 1996, allegations began to surface that Martin had loaned over $600,000 combined to four Michigan players. The scandal led to all of the “Fab Five’s” athletic records being erased from the school.

“Fab Five” player Jalen Rose recently shared his opinion in the Huffington Post. He says, quote: “I am a strong advocate of college players being paid to play sports. Each student-athlete should be paid a stipend of $2,000 per semester. Universities, coaches, apparel companies and everyone in between financially benefits from the success of these student-athletes except for the player themselves.”

What role does gender and sport play?

Should every athlete be paid, regardless of their sport, gender, school, and division they play?

“Does the woman on the cross-country team make the same as the starting quarterback on the football team? And does it really solve the issues of cheating and agents and all of that? That all remains to be seen,” Park explains.

Fine line between amateur and professional

As soon as an athlete receives money for their participation in a sport they are considered a professional. Since NCAA student-athletes currently are not paid, they are considered amateurs. Sue Edson, Assistant Athletics Director for Communications at Syracuse University, believes student-athletes do not lose sight of why they are here.

“You have to look at the bigger issue. College student-athletes, they’re not just athletes, they’re student-athletes. I think if you were to talk to a lot of student-athletes they would say that they believe that they’re here working on their sport, crafting their skills, and getting an education and enjoying it while they’re here,” Edson reiterates.

Until the NCAA finds a way to uphold the emphasis put on education while handing out paychecks, student-athletes will remain just that.

Listen to the story here

[audio:https://nccnewsarchive.expressions.syr.edu/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/NCAA-athletes-Hillary.mp3|titles=NCAA athletes- Hillary]
This entry was posted in BDJ 364.01, Sports and tagged Hillary Fonseca, NCAA, student athletes on by Hillary Fonseca.
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
, EA Sports NCAA Basketball Archives

Blue Devils talk NCAA video games

Coach K College Basketball was the first college basketball video game developed by EA Sports before the rebrand in 1998. It was released in 1995 for Sega Genesis.

It’s been awhile since Tre Jones last played a college basketball video game.


"I think the last time I played it, my oldest brother was in the game," Jones said with a laugh following Duke’s 126-57 exhibition victory against Fort Valley State on Oct. 30.


"I was really young. … I just wanted to play with my oldest brother."


Jones’ brother, Jadee, played at Furman University in South Carolina from 2005-07. In 2006, Jadee was named to the All-Southern Conference freshman team as a 6-foot-2 shooting guard. He transferred and finished out his career at NCAA Division II Minnesota State-Mankota.


But Tre, the Blue Devils’ sophomore floor general, remembers those battles with the Jadee and the Paladins in the virtual world.


A day before Tre Jones took that trip down memory lane, NCAA officials started the discussion for college athletes to benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness.


The decision, which was announced Oct. 29 by the organization’s top governing board, produced a wealth of takes on what it could mean for the future of college athletics.


It also rekindled memories of the NCAA basketball and video games, and the possibility of those games returning in the future. The last game, NCAA Football 14, came out in 2013.


EA Sports’ NCAA Basketball series began in 1998, featuring Wake Forest legend Tim Duncan on the cover. Several other players from the ACC’s in-state programs were featured on the cover in subsequent years, including North Carolina’s Antawn Jamison (1999) and Raymond Felton (2006) and Duke’s Shane Battier (2002).


Verne Lundquist, Brad Nessler, Gus Johnson, Bill Raftery and Dick Vitale were among the voices featured in the game.


"I know that would be really cool to see it come back," Jones said. "If it were to come back I would play it all the time. … It would be extremely cool (to see myself on a game)."


Jack White, a captain along with Jones and senior Javin DeLaurier, recalls playing the latest game in the series, NCAA Basketball 10, which featured Oklahoma standout Blake Griffin.


"I didn’t play the football (game), but I had some NCAA basketball games back in the day — fun games," said White, a senior from Australia.


"Blake Griffin was just dunking on everyone every chance he gets."


Coach K College Basketball was the first college basketball video game developed by EA Sports before the rebrand in 1998. It was released in 1995 for Sega Genesis.


White had "no idea about the game" until sitting down with Joe Ovies, co-host of a radio show on 99.9 The Fan, at ACC Operation Basketball in 2018.


"When Javin and I went to media day last year, we played the Coach K Basketball Game against each other," White said.


"I can’t even remember what console, but I know I beat Javin."


Duke, of course, was White’s preferred team on NCAA Basketball 10.


Solid choice.


The 2009-10 Blue Devils went on to win the national title that season with Kyle Singler, Jon Scheyer and Nolan Smith leading the way. Scheyer and Smith are currently a part of Mike Krzyzewski’s coaching staff.


But freshman Cassius Stanley, like many people throughout the nation, favored EA Sports’ NCAA Football series, which began in 1993 as Bill Walsh College Football before transitioning in 1997 with the release of NCAA Football 98.


"I didn’t really play the college basketball (game)," Stanley said with a smile. "I think everyone played college football."


The Los Angeles native said he was "very dominant" with Southern Cal in NCAA Football 07, which featured former Trojan star and Heisman winner Reggie Bush on the cover.


Still, the thought of playing as himself in a college basketball game moves the needle.


"I would love to have that back," Stanley said. "That would be great to play as yourself. That would be insane."


Staff writer Rodd Baxley can be reached at [email protected] or 910-486-3519.

Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
EA Sports NCAA Basketball Archives

View Full Version : EA Sports NCAA Basketball 09



I picked this up yesterday and I'm already hooked. I'm kind of terrible at this point, since I haven't played a basketball videogame since Bulls v. Lakers on the Sega Genesis, but I'm having a lot of fun. Anyone else planning on getting this one?

I picked this up yesterday and I'm already hooked. I'm kind of terrible at this point, since I haven't played a basketball videogame since Bulls v. Lakers on the Sega Genesis, but I'm having a lot of fun. Anyone else planning on getting this one?

You're an Xbox kid, right?
I'm kind of on the lookout for a couple of new Wii games that I can enjoy during next month's "sit on my [bum] and get dumber for a couple of weeks" phase.

I picked this up yesterday and I'm already hooked. I'm kind of terrible at this point, since I haven't played a basketball videogame since Bulls v. Lakers on the Sega Genesis, but I'm having a lot of fun. Anyone else planning on getting this one?
Saw the ads for that last night while watching the holes. Looks really good, I've got a Wii, would be interesting using numchucks. I'm like you, haven't played a basketball game in years.

I'm kind of on the lookout for a couple of new Wii games that I can enjoy during next month's "sit on my [bum] and get dumber for a couple of weeks" phase.

Looks like somebody is about to be ABD...

Grab yourself a cheap PS2 or something like that. You just can't beat the feeling of being post comps and lazing around on the couch all day playing Madden, Nascar, NHL, Tiger Woods, and any shooter you fancy. Not getting off the couch for hours on end has its benefits.

You're an Xbox kid, right?
I'm kind of on the lookout for a couple of new Wii games that I can enjoy during next month's "sit on my [bum] and get dumber for a couple of weeks" phase.
I have both systems. I picked up the 360 version so I could send my brother a copy for christmas and kick his tarheel butt.

Looks like somebody is about to be ABD...

Not quite, but after this semester, exams are basically all that's left between me and dissertationland. After feeling totally in the weeds for a while, I've had a good couple of weeks, and things are looking up. I definitely don't expect to get much done over the holidays.
I don't really need the PS3, because I have a Wii and my brother has an Xbox 360. I'm just trying to decide how to disburse my limited budget so as to maximize gaming enjoyment.
Mario Kart Wii is a must...I think/hope Santa Bro is bringing that. Besides that, I dunno what I'll do.

I picked this up yesterday and I'm already hooked. I'm kind of terrible at this point, since I haven't played a basketball videogame since Bulls v. Lakers on the Sega Genesis, but I'm having a lot of fun. Anyone else planning on getting this one?

I've been a 2ksports fan (have purchased each of the last four seasons), and had always disliked EA's basketball interface, but 2ksports isn't releasing a college hoops game this year, so I may have to cave and get the one from EA. Going a year w/o a new college hoops game seems like too much to ask, particularly when this and college football is essentially all that I use my xbox for.

Saw the ads for that last night while watching the holes.

Watching the holes?!? You're banished.

I just finished entering the rosters of every team in the ACC. I'm pretty psyched.

It's kind of cool to play in a virtual Cameron and hear the crowd start up with LGD!

Watched the holes to root for Kentucky (what!?!), it's true. Love seeing the Hansborough in street clothes. The more that happens the safer JJ's record is.

Oldest son, when asked if he wanted Santa to bring him anything this year, said he wants this game. Will it be hard to find, do you think? Should I go out and try to buy it right now?

Got it for the PS3 yesterday, need to find someone who has the rosters though before I start a Dynasty.

The game is pretty fun, but like pfr, I miss the 2k series.

My plan is to get it sometime next weekend when I purchase an Xbox 360. I have to get everyone's Xbox names so as I build up my collection, I can play live competition!

I had the EA version a few years back for the PS2 and wasn't too thrilled. I bought the 2K version for the 360 last year and it was a much better game than the EA version on the same console. One thing about the college version of these games is that they are very slow....hard to get a break going and lucky to get a single dunk in a game. I got the NBA 2K for the 360 this year and the gameplay is head and shoulders above the college version of the games...lots of fastbreak dunks, alley oops, 3's...basically all the things that are fun to me. It seems in the college version they slow it down to mimick the real games. Even though I never could watch an entire NBA game the video game is very addicting.

I had the EA version a few years back for the PS2 and wasn't too thrilled. I bought the 2K version for the 360 last year and it was a much better game than the EA version on the same console. One thing about the college version of these games is that they are very slow....hard to get a break going and lucky to get a single dunk in a game. I got the NBA 2K for the 360 this year and the gameplay is head and shoulders above the college version of the games...lots of fastbreak dunks, alley oops, 3's...basically all the things that are fun to me. It seems in the college version they slow it down to mimick the real games. Even though I never could watch an entire NBA game the video game is very addicting.
I've had a very different experience with EA. Perhaps they just made improvements for this version, as I haven't played the previous installations in the series.

I've played about a half a dozen games so far, and regularly get alley-oops (there is actually a button combination to do it, which basically costs a turnover if your breaker isn't clear to the hoop) and fast breaks off the steal or long rebound. There is also a button combination for "ankle-breaker" moves, which lets guards beat their man and drive to the basket.

Regarding 3's, I had Scheyer and Paulus hitting them consistently when open or off of good head fakes or ankle-breakers. As far as dunking goes, in my last game (against UVA) Zoubek was the player of the game with 16 points (3 dunks, 4 off post moves in the paint, and a pair of free throws), a ton of boards, 2 assists and a steal.

I'm very pleased with the game, but maybe I don't know what I'm missing with 2K.

Sounds like they have made it better. I don't plan to buy a college game this year but would like to check this one out.

tempo is the focus of this year's game, and I think they really did a good job with it.

Anyone on PS3 found good rosters yet? I've been waiting on the group at OperationSports.com which is taking forever!

Anyone on PS3 found good rosters yet? I've been waiting on the group at OperationSports.com which is taking forever!
It's pretty quick and easy to just enter the rosters yourself. It took me about 30 minutes to do the entire ACC.

I know, I've done in past years, I'm just lazy, plus with a couple kids, I need to reserve all of my "game-time" for playing the game.

Got it for the PS3 yesterday, need to find someone who has the rosters though before I start a Dynasty.

The game is pretty fun, but like pfr, I miss the 2k series.
Here, let me Google that for you (http://www.letmegooglethatforyou.com/?q=EA+Sports+NCAA+Basketball+09+Roster). ;):D

The operationsports.com forums just finished them early this morning. :)

Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.5 Copyright © 2020 vBulletin Solutions Inc. All rights reserved.
Источник: [https://torrent-igruha.org/3551-portal.html]
.

What’s New in the EA Sports NCAA Basketball Archives?

Screen Shot

System Requirements for EA Sports NCAA Basketball Archives

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *